April 15, 2020

More remote working? And then what?

This post is based on content from remotify.work’s self-paced course for remote teams and team-leaders. The course is delivered in bite-sized chunks by Intao’s digital mentor.

Click here to find out more.

I want to live a meaningful and fulfilled life, and I want to help others do the same.  My chosen path is to bring more, high-quality remote working into the world.  Why?

Remote working, when done well, gives people more balanced lives, more authenticity and presence in their relationships at work, and greater alignment between their work and non-work activities.  Businesses benefit because their teams are more diverse, more cohesive, more engaged, more aware of their context, more productive and more loyal.  Finally, benefits for society emerge in the form of healthier communities, with a diverse mix of more present and available people.

For a long time now, I've been working on building and improving teams.  My first remote work experience was three years at a software engineering company where everyone worked from home for two days every week.  More recently, I built a remote software engineering team from scratch.  In between, I understood links between learning from my personal and spiritual development and what I was seeing happen in my teams.

Agile and Lean advocate an approach where 'there is no failure, only more information'. There is a similar principle of accepting the 'is-ness' of things in the present moment, described by spiritual teacher Eckhart Tolle in the book 'The Power of Now'.

Patrick Lencioni, a business coach and author, has vulnerability-based trust at the base of a pyramid with 'results' at the top.  Brene Brown, an academic in social work turned popular self-help author, identifies vulnerability as the basis of courage and the capacity to live to one's potential.

Jon Kabat-Zinn integrated mindfulness and meditation with mainstream science and advocates for giving more of one's attention to bodily sensations and less to the thoughts in one's mind. Daniel Kahneman, a behavioural economist, catalogued how the stories one's mind constructs are systematically biased. Therefore, paying attention to what you're sensing, prior to interpretations you make up, is essential for practical decision making.

The synthesis of these complementary ideas, some from the 'fluffy' world of spirituality, and some from the 'hard' world of science and business has led me to understand team performance - and how to build it - deeply.  The pioneers of remote working, companies like Automattic, Zapier, Buffer, GitLab and Basecamp learned, sometimes the hard way, that trust matters, mindfulness matters and courage matters.  It all points to the same thing.

I want to live a meaningful and fulfilled life, and I want to help others do the same.  My chosen path is to bring more, high-quality remote working into the world.  Why?  Because, by doing so, I will help more people live a mindful life, with meaningful, fulfilling, trusting relationships amongst people who value the same things.

I'd say that's pretty clear.  What do you think?

This post is based on content from remotify.work’s self-paced course for remote teams and team-leaders. The course is delivered in bite-sized chunks by Intao’s digital mentor.

Click here to find out more.

Latest Posts